CaribPress Talks with South African Consul-General in Los Angeles

Since 2010, Cyril Sibusiso Ndaba has served as Consul-General of South Africa in Los Angeles. His office serves thirteen of the United States states in the West including California. The stated mission of the consulate is “to represent and promote South Africa’s national interests in the USA.”

Since 2010, Cyril Sibusiso Ndaba has served as Consul-General of South Africa in Los Angeles.  His office serves thirteen of the United States states in the West including California.  The stated mission of the consulate is “to represent and promote South Africa’s national interests in the USA.”

Ndaba, 52, was born and educated in the coastal South African city of Durban.  This was not the free South Africa of today.  In 1978, he enrolled at the University of Zululand, but his studies were interrupted three years later when he was suspended for political activism. “Once you are expelled,” Nada said, “it is very difficult for you to be absorbed because you end up being blacklisted.”

Fortunately, Ndaba was able to return to his studies and completed his degree in 1986. He was employed as a school teacher before embarking on a career as a diplomat in a new and free South Africa.

He first served as diplomat in New York from 1995 to 1998, followed by stint in Rwanda from 2000 to 2004.  Prior to his current position, Ndaba served as a Deputy High Commissioner of South Africa to the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland from 2004 to 2010.

This year, the consulate opened its doors to host an Africa Day Celebration on May 25th. The event brought in over a hundred participants representing various business and community interests.  Africa Day is an annual commemoration of the founding of the Organization of African Unity in 1963.
South Africa is part of the South African Development Community (SADC), one of five major inter-governmental regions in the continent of Africa.  The others are the Arab Maghreb Union (representing the northern part of the continent), the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS),  Economic Community of Central African States (ECCAS), and the East African Community (EAC).

For the last five years, there’s been a move to create a sixth region to represent  the African Diaspora including the Caribbean Community (CARICOM).  A summit was planned to discuss the inclusion of the CARICOM nations, but was shelved upon the resignation of President Thabo Mbeki.  However, upon the election of President Jacob Zuma, the talks have resumed.

Reflecting on his struggles against oppression, he does not forget the contributions of those outside South Africa, who tirelessly spoke out against apartheid.  “Had it not been for the pressure which was mounted in the main by our CARICOM, Caribbean Community, brothers and sisters,” Ndaba said,  “South Africa wouldn’t be free today.”

Leave a Reply