CDC warn illnesses from mosquito, tick, and flea bites are on the rise

Feels the US is not fully prepared and better control of mosquitoes and ticks is needed to protect people from these costly and deadly diseases.

vs-0518-Vector-Borne-infographic-920Disease cases from mosquito, tick, and flea bites tripled in the US from 2004-2016, says the Centers for Diseases and Control (CDC).  Over 640,000 cases of disease spread by mosquitoes and ticks reported and 9 new germs have been discovered or introduced in the US.

Between 2004 and 2016, more than 640,000 cases of these diseases were reported, and 9 new germs spread by bites from infected mosquitoes and ticks were discovered or introduced in the US. State and local health departments and vector control organizations are the nation’s main defense against this increasing threat. Yet, 84% of local vector control organizations lack at least 1 of 5 core vector control competencies. Better control of mosquitoes and ticks is needed to protect people from these costly and deadly diseases.

Local and state health departments and vector control organizations face increasing demands to respond to these threats. Weather brings people outside to enjoy it. It also brings bugs, bug bites, and an increased risk of being infected with one of the diseases they can carry.

The most common mosquito-borne viruses were West Nile, Dengue, and Zika, while the most common tick-borne diseases were Lyme disease and anaplasmosis.

Although rare, plague was the most common illness associated with infected fleas.

The CDC says warmer weather is one reason we’re seeing the increase because bugs thrive in it. Dr. Glatter says people visiting overseas is another reason.

“I see more international travel being the vector in other words transmitter a disease is only one plane ride away,” he said. “We can take one disease and put it on another continent in four or five hours.”

Doctors from the CDC say government agencies are doing their part to combat the diseases, but also say we have do do our part.

The Environmental Protection Agency also recommends wearing long sleeve shirts and

Leave a Reply