Crazy, Stupid, Love: A Love Triangle with a Twist

“This is a great story because it involves three different generations of romance,” shares Steve Carell, the movie’s main star.

(L-r) Jonah Bobo as Robbie and Steve Carell as Cal: Photo courtesy of Warner Bros. Pictures

A sweet and quirky flick, which reinvigorates the romantic comedy genre with a delightful and unexpected twist, the story revolves around Steve Carell’s character Cal Weaver.

A forty something year old insurance salesman, Cal is living the dream with a good job, a nice house, and great kids. When he learns that his wife, childhood sweetheart Emily (Julianne Moore) wants a divorce, his “perfect” life soon unravels. Dejected and forlorn, he resorts to spending his nights sulking alone at a local bar, but things soon change when he meets a womanizer by the name of Jacob Palmer (Ryan Gosling) who spices up his dating game.

What makes “Crazy” so delightful are the several other love stories entwined in the script. Not only are Cal and his ex-wife Emily looking for love in all the wrong places, Cal’s 13-year-old son, Robbie (Jonah Bobo), is in love with his 17-year-old babysitter, Jessica (Analeigh Tipton), who harbors a major crush of her own on Cal. Jacob, also has his own crush on Hannah (Emma Stone), a girl he met at the bar that he just can’t seem to get out of his mind.

“This is a great story because it involves three different generations of romance,” shares Carell. “What I found really interesting to explore was the crossover between them and the idea that, even as we get older, we don’t always have all the answers. The lessons we can learn from our kids are sometimes the most surprising.”

A refreshingly different take on relationships, its charismatic cast does a nice job of charting complications of relationship with heart, soul and a recognition that it is better to have loved and lost than to have never loved at all.

There is goofy infatuation, emotional breakthrough, ecstatic connection and, eventually, hope.

Directors Glenn Ficarra and John Requa keep the clichés at bay and bring a humorous and astute script to the screen while joyously exploring the complicated dance of a relationship that manages to feel familiar and relatable.

Anyone who’s ever loved before or at least experienced a complicated relationship should find something to appreciate in “Crazy, Stupid Love.”

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