‘Lucy’ offers an interesting premise but a dismal conclusion

Morgan Freeman, in the authoritarian role we have come to associate with the actor, plays a professor who lectures students on the mind’s potential.

Freeman and JohanssonFrom “La Femme Nikita”to “The Fifth Element,” writer/director Luc Besson has created some of the toughest, most memorable female action heroes in recent cinematic history. With “Lucy,” his latest action-thriller, Besson returns to familiar territory.

Starring Scarlet Johansson as Lucy, a woman with super human powers, the film examines the possibility of what one could do if 100 percent of our brain capacity was used.

In the film, Lucy’s a carefree young student living in Taiwa who is conned by her shady boyfriend her into delivering a briefcase to a ruthless crime lord named Mr. Jang. Kidnapped by the dealers to be a drug mule she’s implanted with a chemically altered drug called CPH4, which explodes in her stomach and turns her into a lethal genius. Before we know it Lucy, who now has 24 hours to live, is scaling walls and ceilings like Spiderman determined to find the bad guys and dish out revenge.

Morgan Freeman, in the authoritarian role we have come to associate with the actor, plays the eminent Professor Norman who lectures students on the mind’s potential.

In theory, there are many powers of the mind that are not fully explained or understood. Things like telepathy, psychokinesis, and extrasensory perception (ESP) fall into this category. Several researchers explored the idea back in the 1930s.

Certainly a thinking man’s movie, the action thriller has an interesting premise but a dismal conclusion.

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